• About the Site

    What happens when two groups who have never talked before share conversation space? What ideas grow out of that generative process? What processes of guidance and mediation guide disparate individuals, communities, and specialized knowledge holders to fruitful imaginations of how technology can impact community? How best can we focus this conversation space towards a specific goal: speculation regarding DIY small-scale robotics technologies and their impact on local organic farming systems? This project is a collaboration between Georgia Institute of Technology and Atlanta's independent food community, rogueApron. This research is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. More information on the City as Learning Lab. Follow Us on Twitter
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N Tech Industries and the Green Seeker

Traditional industrial agriculture relies on large scale application of pesticides that work hand in hand with genetically modified crops. Researchers at Oklahoma State University have developed a soil sensing mechanism that deploys site-specific amounts of chemicals.

To quote the short film:

This is precision agriculture at it’s best. The environment is spared unnecessary spraying of chemicals. The savings in fertilizer translate into cheaper food at the grocery store. And farmers benefit from lower operating costs. [1:27 – 1:39]

This is a version of a Robot Farm – as the title of the film implies – one which the growBot project seeks to develop an alternative to.

More info at the GreenSeeker home.

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